$35 Monthly Insulin Cap Could Save Part D Enrollees 29% Per Prescription

The House in March passed a bill that caps the out-of-pocket cost of insulin at $35 per month for Medicare Part D beneficiaries and for certain privately insured enrollees. A recent Kaiser Family Foundation analysis found that total out-of-pocket spending by Part D enrollees on insulin quadrupled between 2007 and 2019, reaching nearly $1 billion. If a $35 copay cap had been in place in 2019, Part D enrollees without low-income subsidies would have saved $14 per insulin prescription on average. Meanwhile, another study found that over one in four individual and small group enrollees paid more than an average of $35 per month out of pocket for insulin products in 2018. With a $35 cap, median monthly savings could reach $27 in the individual market and $19 in the small and large group markets.

© 2022 MMIT
Jinghong Chen

Jinghong Chen Reporter

Jinghong produces infographics and data stories on health insurance and specialty pharmacy for AIS Health. She graduated from Missouri School of Journalism with a focus on data journalism and international reporting. Before joining AIS in 2018, she worked at WBEZ, Al Jazeera English and The New York Times Chinese.

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