Copay Amounts Have Significant Impact on Cardiovascular Medication Adherence

People with higher copays are significantly less likely to adhere to their commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications than those with low copays, according to a study published this month in JAMA Network Open. Utibe R. Essien, M.D., the study’s lead author, tells AIS Health the variations in adherence based on copays are “striking” and could have broader implications if some of the drugs are approved for obesity as expected and become even more widely used.

Utibe adds that people who do not take these drugs could have serious medical complications, leading to more of a health burden for them and financial burden for payers due to the high costs associated with hospitalizations, emergency room visits and other expenses.

© 2024 MMIT
Tim Casey

Tim Casey

Tim has worked as a reporter and editor for more than 20 years. Before joining AIS Health in December 2021, he was a business reporter covering the commercial real estate industry’s capital markets for four years. He previously covered health care business issues for two medical publishing companies and high school, college and professional sports for the Sacramento Bee newspaper. Tim has a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Notre Dame and an M.B.A. from Georgetown University.

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