Contract Awards

Amid Legal Disputes, Anthem’s NYC Contract Faces Second Delay

Anthem, Inc.’s pending contract to serve retired New York City workers and their dependents — which would have nearly doubled the insurer’s Medicare Advantage Employer Group Waiver Plan (EGWP) enrollment — is in peril. Just days before its planned start, the city’s comptroller refused to register the proposed contract and turned it back to Mayor Eric Adams (D) for a revised cost estimate, putting the already delayed transition to a retiree MA plan on hold.

“Due to the legal and budgetary uncertainties that remain while litigation over the City’s contract with Anthem Insurance Companies continues, the Comptroller’s office does not have sufficient information to register the proposed Medicare Advantage Plan contract at this time,” New York City Comptroller Brad Lander explained in a March 30 statement posted to the comptroller’s website. Subsequently, the city’s Office of Labor Relations posted that the transition to the NYC Medicare Advantage Plus Plan would not be implemented as of April 1 as planned and that all retirees “will remain in their current plans until further notice.”

News Briefs: City of New York Appeals Court Decision on Retiree Switch to Group Medicare Advantage

New York City is appealing a recent ruling by the New York Supreme Court that bars the city from imposing a premium on public sector retirees who opt out of group Medicare Advantage coverage that starts April 1. Anthem, Inc. was initially contracted to provide MA coverage to an estimated 200,000 retirees and dependents for a Jan. 1 effective date. Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Lyle Frank on March 3 ruled that automatic enrollment of beneficiaries cannot start until April 1, retirees must be able to opt out of the new coverage up to three months after the effective date, and they do not have to pay a fee to retain their traditional Medicare coverage. The city’s attempt to charge $191 monthly is in violation of New York City law, which requires the municipal employer to “pay the entire cost of health insurance coverage for city employees, city retirees and their dependents,” Frank ruled. The city’s Office of Labor Relations on March 4 filed an appeal; the NYC Organization of Public Service Retirees at press time had filed a cross-appeal and was gathering signatures for a petition urging Mayor Eric Adams (D) not to pursue the appeal.

News Briefs: America’s Physician Groups and Others Are Urging CMS Not to Cancel GPDC Model

America’s Physician Groups (APG) and other stakeholders at press time were urging the Biden administration not to cancel the Global and Professional Direct Contracting (GPDC) model. The model, in which provider groups and other entities share risk and receive capitated payments for serving fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries, formally launched in April 2021 and has drawn interest from Medicare Advantage organizations. Although CMS put a pause on new applicants for the 2022 performance year, progressive lawmakers have asked the administration to stop it out of concern that private entities are seeking to funnel FFS enrollees into managed care without their knowing. In a sign-on letter to HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra, APG and other groups suggested that instead of canceling the model, the administration should limit participation to provider-led entities and “place additional guardrails and add more beneficiary protections.”

Medicaid Managed Care RFP Radar: What’s Ahead for 2022

With several states issuing requests for proposals (RFPs), 2022 is shaping up to be a solid year for payers pursuing new Medicaid contract awards. Iowa is looking for up to four MCOs to serve Iowa Health Link, up from its current two, and Tennessee’s awards could come by year-end. As for the most hotly competitive RFPs, eyes will be on California and Texas as they prepare to begin the procurement process for contracts that will cover about 3.5 million and 4.3 million lives, respectively. Meanwhile, previous contract awards in Kentucky, Louisiana and the District of Columbia have caused considerable controversy and sparked ongoing legal challenges between payers and state Medicaid officials, prompting rebids. Below, see an overview of key RFPs that are expected to be issued or awarded in the coming months.