Drug Pricing

Study: With High Prices, Rebate Revenue Is Growing for PBMs

New research published in JAMA Health Forum found that rebate revenue for PBMs grew between 2015 and 2019 — but that growing rebate revenue was not passed on to patients.

The research letter’s authors measured both prerebate and postrebate drug costs taken from medical loss ratio (MLR) filings made by plans to CMS. The research sample includes commercial insurance filings from small group, individual and large group health plans across “approximately 2,200 unique health plans” covering 70 million lives.

Do Pharma/PBM Contracts Play Role in Drugmakers’ Revenue Leakage?

Pharma manufacturers depend on contracts with PBMs — and, increasingly, their group purchasing organizations (GPOs) — to ensure favorable formulary positioning with PBMs’ health plan and employer clients. But as those contracts have grown more complex and less transparent, drugmakers may be at risk of losing significant amounts of money, according to some industry experts.

Revenue leakage — unintended revenue loss because of process inefficiencies — can be a huge financial drain on pharma manufacturers. It also may potentially result in compliance risks with the Anti-Kickback Statute and its discount safe harbor protections, “so it always has to be clearly defined as to what the rebate or any monies between pharma and the PBM being exchanged; there has to be a reason,” explains Stephanie Seadler, vice president of Trade Relations at EmsanaRx.

Novartis’ Pluvicto Brings New Mechanism of Action to mCRPC Options

A new prostate cancer drug is sparking interest among payers and oncologists alike, according to a survey by Zitter Insights. While the product offers a new mechanism of action for the indication, the manufacturer recently halted production of the therapy temporarily in two of its three global sites “out of an abundance of caution” due to “potential quality issues” that could pose a glitch in initial uptake of the therapy.

On March 23, the FDA approved Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.’s Pluvicto (lutetium Lu 177 vipivotide tetraxetan) (formerly referred to as 177Lu-PSMA-617) for the treatment of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in people who have been treated with androgen receptor pathway inhibition and taxane-based chemotherapy. The product from Novartis unit Advanced Accelerator Applications USA, Inc. is the first FDA-approved targeted radioligand therapy for eligible people with mCRPC that combines a targeting compound with a therapeutic radioisotope.

Study Finds PBC Drug’s Real-World, Trial Side Effects Are Similar

A recent study of a new drug to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) found that common symptoms experienced by real-world patients were similar to those experienced by people in clinical trials for the agent.

PBC is a chronic disease that causes the liver’s small bile ducts to be destroyed, resulting in permanent liver damage and putting people at risk for liver failure and death. There is no cure for PBC, and the goal of treatment is to slow progression of the condition and manage its symptoms, which most commonly are itching, also known as pruritis, and fatigue.

Major PBMs Look Ahead to 2023 for Biosimilars Boom

With a raft of biosimilars coming to market starting in 2023, major PBMs are touting the pharmacy infrastructure and services that they say will position them to help customers take advantage of cost-saving opportunities in the coming years.

Speaking during recent conference calls to discuss first-quarter 2022 financial results, they also reported healthy client retention levels as PBMs move through the large-employer selling season.

“Our team is quite excited about and well positioned for the accelerating biosimilar trend that we see in front of us for the coming years,” Cigna CEO David Cordani said during a May 6 conference call to discuss first-quarter 2022 financial results, per a transcript from The Motley Fool.

Study: With High Prices, Rebate Revenue Is Growing for PBMs

New research published in JAMA Health Forum found that rebate revenue for PBMs grew between 2015 and 2019 — but that growing rebate revenue was not passed on to patients.

The research letter’s authors measured both prerebate and postrebate drug costs taken from medical loss ratio (MLR) filings made by plans to CMS. The research sample includes commercial insurance filings from small group, individual and large group health plans across “approximately 2,200 unique health plans” covering 70 million lives.

Most Payers Will Review Humira Biosimilars as They Come

Starting next year, biosimilars are expected to generate significant pharmacy cost savings for patients and payers, led by multiple biosimilars of AbbVie Inc.’s blockbuster immunosuppressive drug Humira (adalimumab). With as many as eight Humira competitors expected to launch in 2023, most payers report they will evaluate the biosimilars as they come to market over the course of the year, rather than waiting until all are available before making coverage decisions. And half of payers may adjust Humira contracting in 2022, prior to the biosimilars’ launches.

That’s according to findings from Zitter Insights, which like AIS Health is a division of MMIT. Steve Callahan, a senior manager of market research at MMIT, described Zitter’s market research findings on the Humira biosimilars during an April 5 webinar.

PBM Critics Increasingly Take Their Grievances to Court

As scrutiny on PBMs continues, various stakeholders are turning to the legal system to challenge the business practices of major firms.

Centene Corp. has been the target of the most litigation, having now reached settlements with nine state attorneys general over allegations that its PBM subsidiary Envolve overcharged those states’ Medicaid programs for prescription drugs, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company has set aside $1.25 billion to fund those settlements and potential future lawsuits, and it is in the process of restructuring its PBM holdings.

Drug Price Controls Appear Central to Democratic Priorities

Democratic lawmakers are expected to make a strong push to revive a variety of drug pricing proposals, such as those that would grant CMS the ability to negotiate the price of certain drugs and place a cap on Medicare beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket spending.

House Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has indicated he is targeting the current congressional work period that runs through Memorial Day as the time to make good on drug pricing plans that Democrats have long favored, noted Matt Kazan, managing director of policy with consultancy Avalere Health, during an April 27 webinar.

The convergence of several factors, including looming mid-term elections and the scheduled end of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) could spur Democrats to make a last-ditch effort to resuscitate the Build Back Better Act (BBBA) and the drug pricing controls contained within it — especially since the end of the PHE could significantly impact Medicaid and Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchange enrollment.

Many Medicare Enrollees Can’t Afford Cancer, Specialty Drugs

Large numbers of Medicare beneficiaries who are ineligible for low-income subsidies and have been prescribed high-price prescription drugs for conditions such as cancer don’t initiate their treatment, likely because they can’t afford it, according to new research published in Health Affairs. One of the study’s authors tells AIS Health that severe illness is a possible outcome of noninitiation in the studied clinical areas and adds that proposals under consideration in Congress to cap out-of-pocket spending for Medicare beneficiaries would make a big difference to the affected patients.

According to the paper, “among beneficiaries without subsidies, we observed noninitiation for 30 percent of prescriptions written for anticancer drugs, 22 percent for hepatitis C treatments, and more than 50 percent for disease-modifying therapies for either immune system disorders or hypercholesterolemia.”