Fee-for-service Medicare

MA Stakeholders Take Issue With Bevy of Risk-Related Proposals

From payment related to the growing number of Medicare Advantage enrollees with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) to the proposed exclusion of 2020 data from risk score assumptions, several commenters responding to the 2023 preliminary rate notice questioned various factors that will be used to determine MA plan reimbursement next year. And while AHIP and other MA stakeholders voiced strong support for CMS keeping the coding intensity adjustment at the statutory minimum for 2023, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) took the opportunity to reiterate its contention that MA organizations are overpaid and that the adjustment does not adequately account for the differences in coding between MAOs and fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare.

In the 2023 Advance Notice for MA and Part D plans, CMS said it intended to continue to apply an across-the-board adjustment of 5.9% — the statutory minimum — to offset the effects on MA risk scores of higher levels of coding intensity in MA relative to FFS. AHIP, in its March 4 letter to CMS, said it strongly supports retaining that overall risk score reduction but asked for more detail around CMS’s proposal to exclude 2020 data in its annual “FFS normalization” adjustment, its assumption that 2023 FFS risk scores would return to pre-pandemic trends, how it will incorporate 2021 utilization data into the normalization factor for 2024, and how CMS arrived at the MA risk score trend of 3.5% for 2023.

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MedPAC Urges CMS to Take Action on Coding Intensity Overpayments

CMS’s coding intensity adjustment, which is used to account for the estimated difference between risk scores that hypothetical beneficiaries would receive if enrolled in Medicare Advantage vs. fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare, has led to more than $91 billion in payments to MA plans between 2007 and 2022, asserted a March 3 letter from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) to CMS Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure. The agency in its 2023 Advance Notice proposed to use the statutory minimum adjustment of 5.9%, which MedPAC estimated will lead to an inflated $16.2 billion in payments — and that’s on the conservative end, the commission noted. MedPAC first raised this issue in 2016, when it urged CMS to consider a new model that would use two years of FFS and MA diagnostic data, exclude diagnoses documented only on health risk assessments from either MA or FFS, and then apply an adjustment that fully accounts for the remaining coding differences. The commission in its March letter reiterated its support for this approach.

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© 2024 MMIT

Revamped Direct Contracting Model Still Holds Promise for MAOs

After progressive Democratic lawmakers urged CMS to shut down a fee-for-service Medicare model aimed at fostering more value-based care arrangements, the agency’s Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) on Feb. 24 unveiled a revamped version that it said more closely aligns with its “vision of creating a health system that achieves equitable outcomes through high quality, affordable, person-centered care.” While the three types of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) that may participate starting next year appear to largely mirror the Direct Contracting Entities (DCEs) of the current Global and Professional Direct Contracting (GPDC) Model, CMS aims to ensure that participants in the new model operate as provider-led organizations, have a proven track record of providing care in underserved communities and will not be shifting any enrollees into Medicare Advantage — a key concern expressed by lawmakers and advocates.

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News Briefs: America’s Physician Groups and Others Are Urging CMS Not to Cancel GPDC Model

America’s Physician Groups (APG) and other stakeholders at press time were urging the Biden administration not to cancel the Global and Professional Direct Contracting (GPDC) model. The model, in which provider groups and other entities share risk and receive capitated payments for serving fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries, formally launched in April 2021 and has drawn interest from Medicare Advantage organizations. Although CMS put a pause on new applicants for the 2022 performance year, progressive lawmakers have asked the administration to stop it out of concern that private entities are seeking to funnel FFS enrollees into managed care without their knowing. In a sign-on letter to HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra, APG and other groups suggested that instead of canceling the model, the administration should limit participation to provider-led entities and “place additional guardrails and add more beneficiary protections.”

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© 2024 MMIT