Industry Trends

Radar On Market Access: Independent Pharmacies Push Bill to Increase Access to Part D Preferred Networks

November 19, 2019

In the Medicare Part D market in 2020, preferred cost-sharing pharmacy networks continue to be king. But because independent pharmacies often find themselves shut out of such arrangements, recently introduced legislation is seeking to change that dynamic.

In the Medicare Part D market in 2020, preferred cost-sharing pharmacy networks continue to be king. But because independent pharmacies often find themselves shut out of such arrangements, recently introduced legislation is seeking to change that dynamic.

“The Part D plans have fully adopted preferred networks over the last few years,” Adam Fein, Ph.D., president of Pembroke Consulting, Inc., and CEO of Drug Channels Institute, tells AIS Health. “The [retail] chains obviously have some different strategies but are looking for the foot traffic” that comes from offering lower cost sharing as part of a preferred network.

Meanwhile, many independent pharmacies and the pharmacy services administrative organizations (PSAOs) that represent them in negotiations with health plans are moving away from preferred Part D networks.

Fein says they “have concluded that the incremental traffic they’re going to get is not worth the profit they’re going to sacrifice.”

Ultimately, “I think the open question is, will this create access problems to preferred networks, and does CMS care?” he says.

The National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) isn’t counting on regulatory intervention. The organization is supporting a bill — introduced last month by U.S. Reps. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) and Morgan Griffith (R-Va.) — which would allow any pharmacy located in an underserved area to participate in a Part D preferred network as long as that pharmacy accepts the terms and conditions.

“We’re not asking for different terms and conditions, [or] higher reimbursement; we’re just asking to be able to see what the terms and conditions are to be in the preferred network and then make our best decision if we want to participate or not,” says Ronna Hauser, the president of policy and government affairs operations at NCPA.

The Pharmaceutical Care Management Association opposes the bill.

“The proposed any willing pharmacy provisions threaten the effectiveness of selective contracting with pharmacies as a tool for lowering costs,” says as statement from the PBM trade group.

Perspectives on How Drug Pricing Legislation Impacts Innovation

November 14, 2019

Many innovative new therapies are coming onto the market, but they also are launching with increasingly higher price tags, even as lawmakers and regulators launch a flurry of activity aimed at bringing down drug prices. Some industry experts caution that a few of the bills, if passed, could endanger the research and development efforts around these novel drugs, while others question that hypothesis, AIS Health reported.

Many innovative new therapies are coming onto the market, but they also are launching with increasingly higher price tags, even as lawmakers and regulators launch a flurry of activity aimed at bringing down drug prices. Some industry experts caution that a few of the bills, if passed, could endanger the research and development efforts around these novel drugs, while others question that hypothesis, AIS Health reported.

One of the proposals is the International Pricing Index, an effort by HHS to bring payments for Medicare Part B closer to what 16 other “developed economies” pay for these drugs. The Senate’s Prescription Drug Pricing Reduction Act of 2019 proposes multiple changes to Medicare Part B and Part D, as well as Medicaid. And the House’s Lower Drug Costs Now Act proposes, among other things, requiring HHS to negotiate the prices of up to 250 drugs in Medicare without competitors. Companies not coming to an agreement would be subject to financial penalties.

Drugmakers have vociferously pushed back on many of the proposals, with one of the arguments against them being that the efforts would have a chilling effect on pharma R&D.

“Empirical evidence” exists to support the idea that “lower spending on pharmaceuticals will lead to lower R&D spending and lower yield of innovative drugs,” says Elan Rubinstein, Pharm.D., principal at EB Rubinstein Associates. But “there isn’t enough evidence either way” to say whether “there aren’t policies besides spending that can impact innovation.”

“Additional patent protections and favorable tax treatment of R&D expenditures for drugs designated to treat ‘orphan’ indications appear have resulted in a large push among manufacturers and investors to bring those products to market,” he notes.

According to Lisa Kennedy, Ph.D., chief economist and managing principal at Innopiphany LLC, “the biopharmaceutical industry is responsible for approximately 70% of all innovation within health care. Price fixing of pharmaceuticals has been shown in several studies to have a knock-on effect on innovation.”

She also asserts that oncology, one of the most productive and exciting areas of innovation in the biopharmaceutical industry, could be hit particularly hard.

Trends That Matter for IL-17 Use in Psoriasis

November 7, 2019

For many years, the psoriasis treatment landscape was dominated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. But with the FDA’s approval of three interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibitors — as well as other drugs with different mechanisms of action — for the condition, those therapies are becoming more common among treatment regimens, AIS Health reported.

For many years, the psoriasis treatment landscape was dominated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. But with the FDA’s approval of three interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibitors — as well as other drugs with different mechanisms of action — for the condition, those therapies are becoming more common among treatment regimens, AIS Health reported.

The first IL-17 inhibitor on the U.S. market was Cosentyx (secukinumab) from Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., which launched in 2015. The next therapy was Taltz (ixekizumab) from Eli Lilly and Co., and then on Feb. 15, 2017, the agency approved Siliq (brodalumab) from Ortho Dermatologics.

An AllianceRx Walgreens Prime study sampled 5,215 members who started on an IL-17 from January 2016 through December 2017. The study showed that 2,218, or 42.5%, switched from a prior biologic, while 2,997, or 57.5%, started on an IL-17 as their first psoriasis biologic. Among those who started their biologic regimens on an IL-17 inhibitor, 2,266 started on Cosentyx, followed by 725 who initiated on Taltz and six who started on Siliq.

According to Renee Baiano, Pharm.D., clinical program manager at AllianceRx Walgreens Prime and the lead author of the poster, the main takeaway for payers is that “by [the] last quarter of 2017, IL-17 inhibitors may have gained clinical acceptance in the treatment of psoriasis, given the increase in patients prescribed as their first biologic.” She adds that “it is important for payers to be aware they may see more of their members being prescribed IL-17 inhibitors and will need to determine the appropriate placement of these newer agents within their formulary.”

The graphics below show the current market access to IL-17 inhibitors for all payers under the pharmacy benefit.

 

Radar On Market Access: Some Insurers Cover Acupuncture to Combat Opioid Epidemic

November 7, 2019

Insurers seeking non-opioid alternatives to treat chronic pain increasingly are opting to cover acupuncture, despite scant medical evidence for its effectiveness. In many cases, plans are classifying acupuncture benefits as part of their wellness program instead of as medical benefits, and members don’t need a diagnosis to have sessions covered, AIS Health reported.

Insurers seeking non-opioid alternatives to treat chronic pain increasingly are opting to cover acupuncture, despite scant medical evidence for its effectiveness. In many cases, plans are classifying acupuncture benefits as part of their wellness program instead of as medical benefits, and members don’t need a diagnosis to have sessions covered, AIS Health reported.

The acute need for alternatives to opioids to treat chronic pain is a major reason for new acupuncture coverage, insurers say, and acupuncture is also a member-pleasing bonus.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA) will offer a new acupuncture benefit starting Jan. 1 for all members except for those in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans.

According to Ken Duckworth, M.D., medical director for behavioral health at BCBSMA, combating opioid abuse isn’t the only rationale behind adding acupuncture as a benefit, but “this could also be another step in helping to reduce the number of inappropriate opioid prescriptions being written in Massachusetts.”

Independence Blue Cross began covering acupuncture in January, says Ginny Calega, M.D., vice president of medical affairs. Acupuncture is a covered benefit for Independence large-group commercial plans, she says. It can be used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for patients with chronic pain.

Cigna Corp., meanwhile, will offer limited acupuncture sessions to select MA members beginning in 2020. The insurer’s rationale is different than reasons offered by Independence and the Massachusetts Blues plan: it’s hoping that the benefit could help lure seniors who are on the fence about which MA plan to choose.

CMS also has proposed to cover acupuncture, but only for fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in certain clinical trials.

Perspectives on Pelosi Drug Pricing Legislation

October 31, 2019

Although there is bipartisan support for drug pricing reform and recent bills introduced in the House and the Senate share some concepts, conservatives and pharmaceutical manufacturers have found plenty to dislike about the drug pricing legislation unveiled in September by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), AIS Health reported.

Although there is bipartisan support for drug pricing reform and recent bills introduced in the House and the Senate share some concepts, conservatives and pharmaceutical manufacturers have found plenty to dislike about the drug pricing legislation unveiled in September by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), AIS Health reported.

In addition to restructuring the Part D benefit to include an out-of-pocket cap, the Lower Drug Costs Now Act (H.R. 3) would allow the HHS secretary to negotiate drug prices for at least 250 drugs where there is no effective competition. Manufacturers would be subject to certain transparency requirements and a “noncompliance fee.” Moreover, the bill would require that the negotiated price should be no more than 1.2 times the weighted average of the price in six other countries.

Speaking at AHIP’s 2019 National Conference on Medicare, held Sept. 23-24 in Washington, D.C., American Action Forum President Douglas Holtz-Eakin called H.R. 3 a “terrible bill” and said the structure of an upper limit and a noncompliance penalty is not negotiation but is “price fixing and extortion.” He also argued that its proposed inflation rebate would only incentivize manufacturers to create high launch prices.

Also speaking at the conference, PhRMA Senior Vice President for Policy and Research Jennifer Bryant said that while Pelosi’s bill is being presented as a “benign and fairly incremental approach,” the proposed structure is “not actually one of negotiation at all and is about tying prices in the U.S. to prices internationally.” Moreover, she challenged AHIP, which released a statement in support of the Pelosi bill, to make a case for an “alternative that reduces costs through competition.”

Radar On Market Access: CMS Updates Medicare Plan Finder Amid Advocates’ Concerns

October 31, 2019

Having already rolled out a major redesign of the Medicare Plan Finder in August, CMS recently revealed additional updates it made before the start of Medicare open enrollment on Oct. 15 — including a feature that advocates have said is critical to helping people find the best Part D plan, AIS Health reported.

Having already rolled out a major redesign of the Medicare Plan Finder in August, CMS recently revealed additional updates it made before the start of Medicare open enrollment on Oct. 15 — including a feature that advocates have said is critical to helping people find the best Part D plan, AIS Health reported.

In an Oct. 11 email, a CMS spokesperson said the agency “added a feature that allows Medicare Plan Finder users to sort plans by the total cost of estimated annual drug costs plus premiums.”

SSo did CMS’s plan finder update ease Medicare beneficiary advocacy organizations’ concerns about the redesigned tool? Partially, says Ann Kayrish, the National Council on Aging’s senior program manager for Medicare. She says while it’s good that the sort function is back, the total-cost feature is not available on the plan-comparison page — which makes comparing plans more complicated than it was before.

“In general, the opening week of open enrollment has been rocky as some of the basic information like extra help subsidy levels and copay have been inaccurate, [and] pharmacy status and cost information inconsistent,” she adds. “To increase confidence in plan selections, counselors are spending time contacting the plan or Medicare to confirm coverage information.”

In its Oct. 11 email, CMS noted that it also implemented several other changes to the Medicare Plan Finder prior to open enrollment, including:

  • The ability to display drug tier costs;
  • A footnote for excluded drugs;
  • An option to add mail order on the pharmacy selection page;
  • A note about over-the-counter drugs on the drug lookup page; and
  • An option to compare a third retail pharmacy when mail order isn’t selected