Operations

Jayne Hornung

December 23, 2019

Jayne Hornung is the vice president of pharmacy and medical programs at MMIT. She is MMIT’s clinical subject matter expert, and conducts ongoing research of new indication and policy data while helping the client experience team gain expertise on clinical knowledge. She creates MMIT’s clinical perspectives for all current indications and helped develop the Policies and Restrictions (PAR) data platform. Prior to joining MMIT, Hornung was a medical information scientist at AstraZeneca, a clinical pharmacist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America and Home Solutions Infusion Services,

Jayne Hornung is the vice president of pharmacy and medical programs at MMIT. She is MMIT’s clinical subject matter expert, and conducts ongoing research of new indication and policy data while helping the client experience team gain expertise on clinical knowledge. She creates MMIT’s clinical perspectives for all current indications and helped develop the Policies and Restrictions (PAR) data platform. Prior to joining MMIT, Hornung was a medical information scientist at AstraZeneca, a clinical pharmacist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America and Home Solutions Infusion Services, and owned and operated an independent pharmacy until 2006. She is a registered pharmacist in the state of Pennsylvania.

Q: What’s your day to day like?

On top of developing our oncology product, the client experience team comes to me when they have clinical questions that clients are posing to them. In addition, the operations team asks questions about how to assess policies when they are unsure. So I answer a lot of questions about our data and how our clients can find the answers to their business questions through our data. On a daily basis, I create the workbooks [a comprehensive view of an indication, including the drug market basket and pipeline products] for the clinical content in our data and find what’s important in the policies that’s relevant to our clients and that we should be exposing in our data.

Q: You pioneered some of the internship programs at MMIT. How did that come about and how have those programs grown?

We needed some additional clinical support when we were growing for short term sprints. I had remembered when I was in pharmacy school, we had a lot of opportunities to go and work at different companies, and I thought, “Well, why can’t people come here and learn, because this is an interesting experience!” How drugs are covered by a plan and why they’re covered or not is not taught in pharmacy school, but it’s very much a part of everyday life for a pharmacist. We developed three programs with Philadelphia-area schools. This small level of involvement helps recruit students, so they understand what we do when they get here. If they have interest, they can reach out to me.

I believe as we grow, we’re going to need more clinicians here. As these students who’ve had experiences here graduate, we’re keeping in touch with them so when we have openings, they can apply.

Q: What are some of the other larger projects you’re working on?

We are currently trying to create as many oncology indications as possible and a new Advanced Oncology Analytics platform. Right now, I have eight students working for me remotely who are researching oncology indications so we can get the data into the database quickly and we can stand up our oncology offering as soon as possible.

Q: What clinical areas should clients be keeping an eye on?

Oncology is the area that has not truly been managed by health plans, and it’s where drug approvals are growing exponentially year over year. The criteria is also the most complex that we’ll see in policies, so there’s a real need in the industry for pharma companies and doctors to understand how those are managed, so their patients can get access.

Q: Are there any big industry trends that clients should be looking out for?

I don’t think it’s a shift that clients aren’t aware of, but I think as the cost of drugs go up and health plans need to manage those costs, our client success leads are getting questions every day about how the policies are changing, and how payers are changing their policies to respond to the high cost of drugs, and to more oncology drugs being in the market. Those are the big questions that everybody is watching to see what happens over the next few years, specifically in oncology because there’s so much growth there.

Q: How is MMIT poised to help with the current trends we’re seeing in market access?

Since we sit in a unique position between the payers, providers and pharma, we can expose the policy data so doctors understand what pathway they need to follow for patients to get access to the appropriate therapy at the appropriate place in treatment. Pharmaceutical manufacturers can make sure that they’re doing everything they can for patients to get access to the medications that are available on the market. As far as our provider network, we push all of this information out to providers. It’s important that we sit where we can be transparent with all of this information.

Q: What’s your favorite part of your job?

Every day is new. Every day is different questions, it’s never ever the same and it’s not boring. I love the variety in it, there’s always a new indication to stand up, there’s always a new workbook to build. So that and the education part of it are my two favorite things.

Q: What do you like to do outside of work?

We own a boat, so we go boating almost every weekend when the weather’s nice. I like to travel, and we go boating everywhere, the Chesapeake, Delaware, and my daughter lives in Miami, so we love to go there too. I also love to craft, so I knit and crochet, you name it. I’m a crafter, or “maker” as they call them now.

by Carina Belles

Bob Lombardi

November 21, 2019

Bob Lombardi is the director of policies and restrictions (PAR) data operations at MMIT. Lombardi joined MMIT five years ago as a contractor to aid in the development of MMIT’s Medicare project. From there, he was brought on as a full-time employee where he has worked as a project manager, team manager and director. As the director of PAR operations, Lombardi oversees the day-to-day aspects of all PAR data updates and has played an integral role in launching MMIT’s payer data team.

Bob Lombardi is the director of policies and restrictions (PAR) data operations at MMIT. Lombardi joined MMIT five years ago as a contractor to aid in the development of MMIT’s Medicare project. From there, he was brought on as a full-time employee where he has worked as a project manager, team manager and director. As the director of PAR operations, Lombardi oversees the day-to-day aspects of all PAR data updates and has played an integral role in launching MMIT’s payer data team.

How did you join the company?

My education is in astrophysics and aerospace engineering. I spent the first eight years of my career building satellites for Lockheed Martin. When the plant closed and I was offered relocation, I decided not to move because I wanted to start a family. I made a big career change coming to MMIT, but the many opportunities and recognition of hard work that embodies this company’s culture has been rewarding.

What’s a typical day like for you?

I spend a lot of my day solving problems and answering questions. I oversee the managers of the different PAR teams and make sure they have everything they need to be successful. A lot of that is helping clear any blocking issues for them, but it also includes giving them tools and metrics to keep the teams organized and productive. I also do a lot of thinking, as I am responsible for helping design our operational processes and plan for what’s upcoming.

Can you describe how the data teams you manage fit into the company?

I oversee the PAR segment of the data operations, which is made up of several different teams. Our cycle team maintains our data and ensures it’s timely. Our new indications and prototype teams are focused on building newly sold indications and ensuring they become operational. The new-to-market team is focused on high profile drugs that have recently launched or will be launching into the market.

Can you describe the process for new employees coming onto the team? How they start out as temps, move into a full-time role, and advance within the company?

We strive to put people in the best position to succeed and grow within the company. As people grow into new positions, we often will backfill their role with a temp. Our temps are given the opportunity to learn our data and processes and eventually perhaps find their opportunities within the company.

We have several examples of people who started as temps and have moved up in the company. I’m one of them. I started as a contractor about five years ago. My first task was to build a process for the Medicare project and that turned into a project manager role, which turned into a manager role, which turned into a director role.

What are some of the larger projects you’re working on?

We’ve been working over the last six months to establish our payer data backbone, and we’ve built a team that is a mix of new temps and experienced employees to maintain that data. Their main purpose is to research and find new formularies and plans and make updates to our payer data structure based on their findings. We’ve recently introduced managed care organizations (MCOs) into our dataset, and the payer data team is responsible for maintaining the payer hierarchy as well. They’ll also be staying on top of some of the bigger merger and acquisition activity that is expected to occur in 2020.

What’s been your biggest victory with a client or the company in general so far?

The success of PAR has been a big victory. I started by managing the precursor to PAR when it became operational, but that process was project-based and not scalable. We analyzed the data and the processes and came up with a way to execute more efficiently. I helped design the data structure, tools, and team. The success of those efforts and our ability to evolve PAR has provided a lot of value for the business and our clients.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

There are a lot of fun aspects to my job, but the people I work with are my favorite. I work with so many talented people at each level who are all working hard toward the same goals.

What are the challenges of your role?

The pace at which the company is growing tends to create new challenges for operations, often in the form of adjusting or creating processes, tools and teams. Solving these challenges requires being creative, flexible and fast.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I have two small kids at home, and my life outside here is about enjoying my family. We like to travel and to cook, and when we can, try different local cuisine. We love just getting out with the kids and watching them grow up.