Speciality

MMIT Reality Check on Major Depressive Disorder (Mar 2020)

March 20, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for major depressive disorder treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for major depressive disorder treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for major depressive disorder treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 36% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: Nasal spray Spravato (esketamine) entered the market in spring 2019 as the first truly new product for major depressive disorder in years, but despite its potential to be a game-changer for those with treatmentresistant depression, most people with the condition will continue to be treated with tried-and-true generics.

Radar On Market Access: COVID-19 Outbreak Could Impact Drug Supply Long-Term

March 19, 2020

Industry experts say the COVID-19 outbreak is unlikely to limit U.S. drug supplies in the short or middle term. However, they tell AIS Health that increased demand for longer-duration stocks of medication from self-isolating patients could strain supplies going forward.

Industry experts say the COVID-19 outbreak is unlikely to limit U.S. drug supplies in the short or middle term. However, they tell AIS Health that increased demand for longer-duration stocks of medication from self-isolating patients could strain supplies going forward.

“We are told at this point that we’re not seeing any [drug] shortages in the marketplace today,” says Kelly McGrail-Pokuta, Prime Therapeutics’ vice president of pharmaceutical trade.

On Feb. 27, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn released a statement that said disruptions to the pharmaceutical supply chain have been minimal so far. The statement also said that the FDA was especially focused on 20 manufacturers that are particularly dependent on operations in China, and found that “none of these firms have reported any shortage to date.”

But on March 10, the FDA postponed all inspections of overseas drug manufacturing facilities “through April, effective immediately,” according to another statement released by Hahn.

During a pandemic, the CDC recommends anyone taking prescription medication to manage a chronic condition keep an expanded supply of their medicine on hand. As more people self-isolate, and consumers seek to spend less time in stores and other public places, demand for backup medication is likely to increase.

Mike Schneider, a principal at Avalere Health who previously worked for CVS Caremark, says PBMs and payers will have to rethink their typical posture toward chronic medication as enrollees stock up in anticipation of self-isolation.

“Hopefully, with everything going on related to coronavirus and people wanting to stock up, those quantity limits would be eased or eliminated for the most part for chronic meds,” says Schneider.

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association’s “network of 36 independent and locally operated” affiliates have all decided to waive prescription refill limits on maintenance medications, according to America’s Health Insurance Plans. Other non-Blues insurers have also taken steps to allow members to refill prescriptions in advance.

Experts say it’s difficult to know whether the drug supply will be affected down the road. Schneider says consumer stockpiling and the FDA’s move to suspend foreign inspections could both make an impact on future supply.

MMIT Reality Check on Hereditary Angioedema (Mar 2020)

March 13, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for hereditary angioedema treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for hereditary angioedema treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for hereditary angioedema treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 67% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: The FDA will review BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc.’s application for oral, once daily berotralstat for the prevention of swelling attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema, with a decision expected by early December 2020.

MMIT Reality Check on HIV (Mar 2020)

March 6, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for HIV treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for HIV treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for HIV treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 78% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered without utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In September 2019, the FDA expanded the indications of Pifeltro (doravirine) in combination with other antiretroviral agents and Delstrigo (doravirine/lamivudine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) as a complete regimen to treat adults with HIV-1 infection who are virologically suppressed on a stable antiretroviral regimen with no history of treatment failure and no known substitutions associated to resistance to Pifeltro or Delstrigo’s components.

Radar On Market Access: New Generic HIV Drug May Impact PrEP Coverage, Not HIV Coverage

March 5, 2020

A generic version of Truvada coming on the market later this year will affect how payers cover pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), but it will not significantly change how payers cover HIV drugs, experts tell AIS Health.

A generic version of Truvada coming on the market later this year will affect how payers cover pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), but it will not significantly change how payers cover HIV drugs, experts tell AIS Health.

Gilead Sciences, Inc.’s Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) was approved by the FDA in 2004 to treat HIV infection in combination with other antiretroviral drugs. In 2012, it also was approved as the first drug for PrEP. In March 2019, Gilead announced that it had entered into an agreement with Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. to allow the company to launch its generic version on Sept. 30, 2020.

Payer coverage of PrEP also will be affected by a recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). In 2019, the USPSTF recommended PrEP therapy for those at high risk of HIV acquisition, according to a white paper written by Lynn Nishida, R.Ph., vice president of clinical product and contracting for WithMe Health.

“With the USPSTF recommendation, Medicaid expansion programs and health plans are going to have to cover PrEP without any cost sharing,” says Tim Horn, director of medication access and pricing at the National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors. Therefore, payers will move toward generic versions.

Dan Mendelson, founder and former CEO of consulting firm Avalere Health, says that whenever a drug goes generic, payers usually have a plan in place to make sure the generic is used. “The more expensive the drug, the more likely that the plan will be comprehensive and aggressive,” he says.

Since HIV is one of the six protected classes in the Medicare Part D program, Part D plans typically cover all HIV products, says Michael Schneider, principal at Avalere Health, as there is little to no rebating in the category. “So, there is really no incentive for the PBMs acting on behalf of their clients, the plans, to do anything in terms of a utilization management standpoint or negotiation standpoint outside of just bringing the generics on formulary.”

Most of the branded HIV products are in the Part D specialty tier, requiring coinsurance, due to their high cost. When a generic comes on the market, plans typically will remove the branded product and then place the generic in the specialty tier or the preferred brand tier depending on the cost of the generic product, he says.

MMIT Reality Check on Rheumatoid Arthritis (Feb 2020)

February 28, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for rheumatoid arthritis treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for rheumatoid arthritis treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for rheumatoid arthritis treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 71% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In November 2019, the FDA approved Pfizer Inc.’s Abrilada (adalimumab- afzb) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, adult Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and plaque psoriasis. It is the fifth biosimilar of AbbVie Inc.’s Humira (adalimumab) that the agency has approved.