Speciality

MMIT Reality Check on Epilepsy (Jan 2020)

January 24, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for epilepsy treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for epilepsy treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for epilepsy treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, almost 31% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In January 2020, the FDA approved Neurelis, Inc.’s Valtoco (diazepam nasal spray) as an acute treatment of intermittent, stereotypic episodes of frequent seizure activity that are different from usual seizure patterns in people at least 6 years old with epilepsy.

MMIT Reality Check on Prostate Cancer (Jan 2020)

January 17, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for prostate cancer treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for prostate cancer treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for prostate cancer treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, almost half of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In December 2019, the FDA granted another indication to Xtandi (enzalutamide) for the treatment of men with metastatic castrationsensitive prostate cancer.

Radar On Market Access: 2020 Could Be ‘Wild Year’ for Consolidated PBMs

January 14, 2020

Though the two major transactions that upended the PBM landscape — Cigna Corp. buying Express Scripts Holding Co. and CVS Health Corp. acquiring Aetna Inc. — have already taken place, that doesn’t mean the sector won’t see more changes this year, industry experts tell AIS Health.

Though the two major transactions that upended the PBM landscape — Cigna Corp. buying Express Scripts Holding Co. and CVS Health Corp. acquiring Aetna Inc. — have already taken place, that doesn’t mean the sector won’t see more changes this year, industry experts tell AIS Health.

“The market is evolving,” says Brian Anderson, a principal with Milliman, Inc. The year 2020 will be marked by a presidential election and significant price pressure on manufacturers, along with pharmacies trying to retain their margin, he adds, “so it’s going to be a really wild year.”

Indeed, 2019 ended with Prime Therapeutics LLC and Express Scripts unveiling a three-year collaboration in which the latter PBM will negotiate with pharmaceutical manufacturers, on behalf of Prime’s members, for drugs covered on the pharmacy benefit, as well as provide services related to retail network contracting.

By teaming up with Prime, Express Scripts will be leading rebate negotiations and pharmacy network development for 103 million people, Adam Fein, Ph.D., CEO of Pembroke Consulting, Inc.’s Drug Channels Institute, wrote in a blog post. “This combined volume of Express Scripts and Prime will have enormous leverage with manufacturers and pharmacies,” he noted.

To Ashraf Shehata, KPMG national sector leader for health care and life sciences, the Prime/Express Scripts partnership is yet another example of “pure play” PBMs’ move toward consolidation. Given that trend, the opportunity to scale up both organizations’ purchasing power, and “the ability to kind of lock in Blue clients,” Shehata says, “I think it makes a lot of sense” for the two PBMs to team up.

Employers, meanwhile, are likely to press PBMs of all varieties for innovative solutions — not just deep drug-pricing discounts — during the selling season for 2021 contracts, Anderson says.

Therefore, “there’ll probably be a lot of new innovators in the market — people coming up with new products that maybe look and sound different,” he says. “But the question people are going to have to ask is, how different really is it? And is it really a differentiator in the marketplace?”

MMIT Reality Check on Cystic Fibrosis (Jan 2020)

January 10, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for cystic fibrosis treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for cystic fibrosis treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for cystic fibrosis treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, almost 45% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators (Vertex Pharmaceuticals’ Trikafta, Symdeko, Orkambi and Kalydeco) are the first type of CF therapy to treat the root cause of the disease rather than the symptoms. Although costly, these therapies have made a large impact on market value.

MMIT Reality Check on Growth Hormone Deficiency (Jan 2020)

January 3, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for growth hormone deficiency treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for growth hormone deficiency treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for growth hormone deficiency treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, more than 63% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: As more growth hormone products become available, payers have even more tactics available to them to manage this specialty class. In particular, payers can manage their unit costs for these therapies by contracting with manufacturers to prefer products.

Radar On Market Access: New Sickle Cell Medications Offer Both Opportunities and Challenges

January 2, 2020

The first targeted therapy to treat pain crises in people with sickle cell disease presents a “welcome” new option that payers likely will embrace, a PBM head tells AIS Health. While the drug’s manufacturer cites “positive” early discussions with payers on it, some experts note the lifetime treatment — via a monthly intravenous infusion — is costly: around $100,000 annually.

The first targeted therapy to treat pain crises in people with sickle cell disease presents a “welcome” new option that payers likely will embrace, a PBM head tells AIS Health. While the drug’s manufacturer cites “positive” early discussions with payers on it, some experts note the lifetime treatment — via a monthly intravenous infusion — is costly: around $100,000 annually.

On Nov. 15, the FDA approved Novartis’ Adakveo (crizanlizumab-tmca), a treatment to fight the underlying cause and reduce the frequency of vaso-occlusive crisis, described as a common and painful complication of sickle cell disease. It is approved for patients ages 16 and older with the genetic blood disorder.

Hydroxyurea, a drug approved by the FDA in 1998, is now generic, costs about $1,000 a year, and is approved for children, the New York Times reported on Dec. 7. The two newcomers are Adakveo and Global Blood Therapeutics’ Oxbryta (voxelotor), a daily pill granted accelerated approval by the FDA 10 days after Adakveo’s approval. This led one expert to tell the news outlet that insurers likely will want to begin with hydroxyurea as the front-line therapy.

Yet Mesfin Tegenu, R.Ph., president of PerformRx, LLC, says that “options for patients with sickle cell disease have been very limited up to this point, so the approval of Adakveo is a welcome addition in the treatment of this debilitating disease.”

Eric Althoff, a Novartis spokesperson, says the company anticipates that health plans will see a value proposition with Adakveo. “Early discussions with payers are positive,” Althoff says. “In fact, a number of payers have already added Adakveo to medical policy including state Medicaid [programs].” Florida and Alabama’s Medicaid programs have agreed to cover Adakveo, Reuters reported on Dec. 20.