Trends That Matter

Trends That Matter for Oncology Biosimilars Management

July 18, 2019

Magellan Rx Management, the PBM division of Magellan Health, Inc., on June 4 announced its launch of an oncology biosimilars program, preparing its health plan customers for the expected market entry of biosimilars for three cancer-fighting drugs — Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin — later this year, AIS Health reported.

Magellan Rx Management, the PBM division of Magellan Health, Inc., on June 4 announced its launch of an oncology biosimilars program, preparing its health plan customers for the expected market entry of biosimilars for three cancer-fighting drugs — Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin — later this year, AIS Health reported.

“Oncology is by far the largest therapeutic area for drug spend on the medical benefit, and it is even higher in Medicare,” Steve Cutts, senior vice president and general manager for Magellan Rx’s specialty drug unit, tells AIS Health. Thus, he says, the PBM will be focusing the oncology biosimilars program “on all lines of business for our clients.”

The three oncology brand drugs together account for $9 billion in U.S. drug sales, and almost $50 million in annual drug spend per 1 million covered commercial lives, Magellan Rx says. The PBM anticipates savings of $5 million to $8 million per 1 million covered lives via its new program but sees “potential for even greater savings based on [its] past successes with biosimilars.”

Cutts notes that Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin “all have FDA approved biosimilars which are due to be launched and available on the market in 2019, with some speculated to be available as soon as this month.”

Trends That Matter for Oncology

July 3, 2019

The oncology space continued its trend of developing innovative therapies — both those launching and in the pipeline — in 2018. That’s according to a new report from the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science titled Global Oncology Trends 2019: Therapeutics, Clinical Development and Health System Implications. And while the outlook continues to look promising in terms of the science, it may pose issues to the health care system that need to be resolved in order to take full advantage of next-generation oncology products, AIS Health reported.

The oncology space continued its trend of developing innovative therapies — both those launching and in the pipeline — in 2018. That’s according to a new report from the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science titled Global Oncology Trends 2019: Therapeutics, Clinical Development and Health System Implications. And while the outlook continues to look promising in terms of the science, it may pose issues to the health care system that need to be resolved in order to take full advantage of next-generation oncology products, AIS Health reported.

The 15 new oncology drugs and one supportive care drug launched last year for 17 tumor types marked a record. “Importantly, one of the new drugs is tissue-agnostic” — Loxo Oncology, Inc. and Bayer Corp.’s Vitrakvi (larotrectinib) — noted Murray Aitken, executive director of the institute, during a May 23 media call to discuss the report’s findings. “Over half of the new drugs are oral therapies, continuing this trend toward more of the targeted, innovative therapies being available in an oral form. Two-thirds of the new drugs have an orphan indication, continuing this trend towards cancer being redefined into narrower segments.”

Among the new drugs, more than half have a predictive biomarker on their label.

“This is a trend, the movement towards precision medicine and the growing role that predictive biomarkers are having, both in the way in which the drugs are tested in the clinic, as well as used in practice, where patients can be tested for a biomarker in advance of being treated with a particular drug,” maintained Aitken.

Trends That Matter for COPD Medications

June 20, 2019

A new generic alternative for GlaxoSmithKline’s Advair Diskus (fluticasone/salmeterol) provides payers with the chance to better manage care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition in which high out-of-pocket costs often lead to lower compliance and an increased risk of hospitalization, AIS Health reported.

A new generic alternative for GlaxoSmithKline’s Advair Diskus (fluticasone/salmeterol) provides payers with the chance to better manage care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition in which high out-of-pocket costs often lead to lower compliance and an increased risk of hospitalization, AIS Health reported.

Advair Diskus, a combination long-acting beta-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid, has been one of the most common drugs used for COPD, a condition largely dominated by brand products. The generic, marketed by Mylan and approved Jan. 30, joins generics for two additional COPD devices: a generic for Ventolin HFA (albuterol) and one for Proair HFA (albuterol).

All three have the potential to save payers and patients significant money. Charline Shan, R.Ph., vice president, access experience team at payer insights and strategy firm Precision for Value, says plans have multiple options for structuring their formularies with the amount of generic options available.

Generics are typically included, with brand drugs placed on preferred or nonpreferred tiers based on price, “but not all are required or have to be on the formulary since there are many branded and therapeutic equivalent options,” she says.

Below is the current market access to COPD medications under the pharmacy benefit:

Trends That Matter for Use of Biologics

June 6, 2019

Almost 5.8 billion prescriptions were dispensed in the United States in 2018, an increase of 2.7% over the previous year, according to the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science’s report Medicine Use and Spending in the U.S.: A Review of 2018 and Outlook to 2023, AIS Health reported.

Almost 5.8 billion prescriptions were dispensed in the United States in 2018, an increase of 2.7% over the previous year, according to the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science’s report Medicine Use and Spending in the U.S.: A Review of 2018 and Outlook to 2023, AIS Health reported.

Retail and mail pharmacies dispensed 127 million specialty prescriptions last year, an increase of 15 million since 2014. In 2018, for the second year in a row, specialty prescription volume grew more than 5% although the medicines accounted for only 2.2% of prescriptions overall. With an increase in the availability of oral and self-injected specialty therapies, these drugs “are increasingly dispensed through retail pharmacies,” said Murray Aitken, executive director of the institute, during a May 6 press call.

The use of biosimilars — which the institute defines on a broader basis than only those therapies approved through the 351(k) pathway — “in terms of volume is still modest,” said Aitken, with these therapies representing less than 2% of the total biologics market in 2018. But in those areas where a biosimilar is available, “there is reasonably rapid uptake.”

Trends That Matter for Infliximab Biosimilars

May 23, 2019

Magellan Rx Management saw a significant shift in utilization from Janssen Biotech, Inc.’s Remicade (infliximab) to biosimilars after it implemented a comprehensive utilization management (UM) program, resulting in 34% drug cost savings, the PBM reported.

Magellan Rx Management saw a significant shift in utilization from Janssen Biotech, Inc.’s Remicade (infliximab) to biosimilars after it implemented a comprehensive utilization management (UM) program, resulting in 34% drug cost savings, the PBM reported.

The program, which began in late 2017, involves any patient prescribed an infliximab product for any indication, and is available to all payer clients as an opt-in option, Steve Cutts, senior vice president and general manager, tells AIS Health.

When Magellan Rx began the infliximab program in the fourth quarter of 2017, 100% of the PBM’s patients receiving an infliximab product received Remicade and none took biosimilars, the PBM said. In the third quarter of 2018, the last quarter for which Magellan has data, 86% of patients got the biosimilar and 14% took the brand-name drug.

The FDA approved the first infliximab biosimilar, Pfizer, Inc.’s Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb), in April 2016. The agency now lists three approved infliximab biosimilars: Inflectra; Merck & Co., Inc.’s Renflexis (infliximab-abda); and Pfizer’s Ixifi (infliximab-qbtx). Pfizer is not launching Ixifi in the U.S. since it already has Inflectra on the market, so only Inflectra and Renflexis are being sold in the U.S.

Below is the current market access to Remicade, Inflectra and Renflexis under the pharmacy benefit:

Trends That Matter for Colorectal Cancer Medications

May 9, 2019

As innovations in digital capabilities continue to be used with various health care products, Proteus Digital Health, Inc. is developing a suite of what it terms digital medicines. And while the company has been working on such products for a few years, it recently came out with the first such product within the oncology space, AIS Health reported.

As innovations in digital capabilities continue to be used with various health care products, Proteus Digital Health, Inc. is developing a suite of what it terms digital medicines. And while the company has been working on such products for a few years, it recently came out with the first such product within the oncology space, AIS Health reported.

Proteus is partnering with Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota Health to offer oral capecitabine combined with an ingestible sensor to treat stage 3 and stage 4 colorectal cancer patients.

David Purdie, vice president of medical affairs at Proteus, explains that through an open capsulation process, a pharmacist will place a capecitabine pill and a sensor within a capsule and then seal it. The capsule dissolves within a person’s stomach within a minute or so after it’s ingested. “Each sensor has a unique identifier,” and after the capsule dissolves, an app on a mobile device transmits data such as the time of the dose, the medication taken, the dosage of the drug and certain patient reactions to the drug to the cloud, where the information matches up with a database. “Every pill is uniquely identified,” so if someone takes 30 different pills at one time, the database will be able to know exactly what each medication is.

Below is the current market access to colorectal cancer medications under the pharmacy benefit: