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MMIT Reality Check on Pain Narcotic Opioid (May 2020)

May 15, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for pain narcotic opioid treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for pain narcotic opioid treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for pain narcotic opioid treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 35% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: Many brand name products (Xtampza ER, Oxaydo) continue to enter this market despite the numerous generics. Given assumed parity in efficacy among remaining name-brand products, contracting for position after a generic is common.

Perspectives on Coronavirus Antibody Testing

May 14, 2020

With the Trump administration anxious to “reopen” the U.S. economy and ease the social-distancing measures meant to slow the spread of COVID-19, officials have pointed to antibody testing as a critical tool to accomplish those goals. To that end, the administration on April 11 issued a document clarifying that most private health plans must cover such tests, which detect antibodies against the new coronavirus found in the blood of people who have been infected and now may be immune.

With the Trump administration anxious to “reopen” the U.S. economy and ease the social-distancing measures meant to slow the spread of COVID-19, officials have pointed to antibody testing as a critical tool to accomplish those goals. To that end, the administration on April 11 issued a document clarifying that most private health plans must cover such tests, which detect antibodies against the new coronavirus found in the blood of people who have been infected and now may be immune.

“It’s not exactly a surprise, [but] I don’t know that it was 100% expected,” Jason Karcher, a Milliman Inc. actuary, tells AIS Health regarding the requirement. “It seems like as much a point of clarification rather than a ‘hey, we’re going to require something totally out of the blue.'”

So far, at least serological tests have received an Emergency Use Authorization from the FDA.

Cost information is not as readily available for serological tests as it is for tests that diagnose COVID-19, which cost around $51 until CMS increased the reimbursement rate for “high-throughput” diagnostic tests to $100. Cellex, which makes one of the antibody tests that received emergency authorization by the FDA, did not respond to an inquiry about the price of its test as of press time, but Vox reported that “a serological test can be less than $10.”

William Schaffner, M.D., a professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University, says there are good reasons to temper expectations about how testing people for COVID-19 antibodies could help the U.S. reopen businesses, schools and events.

Since the FDA is essentially allowing companies to do their own evaluation of serological tests’ effectiveness, that will naturally invite questions about whether their results can be trusted, Schaffner says, suggesting that some tests may be more rigorously evaluated than others. “Then there’s the question of availability of the tests — we’ve been down this road once before, where people were told that the nasal swab test for the virus itself would be widely available, and anybody can have it who wants it,” he says. “Well, we’re still struggling with that, and we would like not to repeat that fiasco.”

Radar On Market Access: COVID-19 May Drive More Insurers Into ACA Exchanges

May 14, 2020

As the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reverberate throughout the U.S. economy, it’s become clear that there will be a major enrollment shift away from employer-sponsored plans and into Medicaid and the individual market, AIS Health reported.

As the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reverberate throughout the U.S. economy, it’s become clear that there will be a major enrollment shift away from employer-sponsored plans and into Medicaid and the individual market, AIS Health reported.

In fact, one recent analysis suggested that there could be “unprecedented growth” in the individual health insurance market. “The impact of COVID-19-related job losses will likely more than double the current enrollment in Individual & Marketplace plans, with the potential for the Individual market to triple in size to over 35 million in a sustained and severe economic contraction,” stated the analysis from A2 Strategy Group.

Such growth, the report said, “will come from newly unemployed individuals in all states who exceed Medicaid eligibility thresholds” because of money they receive from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act. And in states that haven’t expanded Medicaid, nearly all of the newly unemployed who earn below 100% of the federal poverty level could qualify for Affordable Care Act premium subsidies.

Another analysis from the Urban Institute and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), estimated that if U.S. unemployment reaches 20%, 25 million people would lose employer-sponsored health insurance. “Of these, 11.8 million would gain Medicaid coverage, 6.2 million would gain marketplace or other private coverage, and 7.3 million would become uninsured,” it stated.

Katherine Hempstead, the senior adviser to the executive vice president at RWJF, says it’s possible the coming enrollment shifts will cause some health insurers to re-evaluate their level of participation in the ACA exchanges, which some large insurers left in 2017 and 2018 before the market stabilized.

In fact, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said on May 12 that UnitedHealth filed to offer plans on the sate’s ACA exchange in 2021, bringing the total number of insurers in that market from two to three.

Ari Gottlieb, a principal at A2 Strategy Group, says the effect may be even stronger after 2021.

“If the market doubles to 25 or 30 million, some of that will probably fall off, but some of that will probably stay,” he says. “I think even a year or two from now, we’re going to have a bigger individual market than we had before.”

Radar On Market Access: CVS Sees COVID Testing Sites as Part of Bigger HealthHUB Strategy

May 12, 2020

Since acquiring Aetna, CVS Health Corp. has touted its HealthHUB stores — which include expanded clinics, labs for health screening and space for wellness pursuits — as the linchpin of its plan to stand out among other large, diversified firms that include a health insurer. Yet as one analyst pointed out during CVS’s first-quarter 2020 earnings call on May 6, that strategy could face new challenges amid the COVID-19 pandemic when many people are reluctant to venture outside their homes.

Since acquiring Aetna, CVS Health Corp. has touted its HealthHUB stores — which include expanded clinics, labs for health screening and space for wellness pursuits — as the linchpin of its plan to stand out among other large, diversified firms that include a health insurer. Yet as one analyst pointed out during CVS’s first-quarter 2020 earnings call on May 6, that strategy could face new challenges amid the COVID-19 pandemic when many people are reluctant to venture outside their homes.

CVS executives said that while the company is indeed seeing less foot traffic at its brick-and-mortar locations, it is still leveraging the power of having a vast retail footprint by offering testing for the new coronavirus, AIS Health reported.

The firm teamed up with federal, state and local governments to open “large-scale diagnostic testing sites across five states,” according to a slide deck that accompanied CVS’s earnings presentation. As of May 4, the company had administered nearly 90,000 tests, and it is planning to establish additional testing sites.

As CEO Larry Merlo put it: “We’re focused on COVID testing today, but there is a broader universe of diagnostics and monitoring that we see becoming an important part of our HealthHUB strategy.”

Merlo also pointed out that virtual visits through the company’s MinuteClinic platform rose 600% in the first three months of 2020 compared with the prior-year quarter. Retail prescription home delivery increased more than 1,000% and specialty pharmacy digital refills jumped about 50%.

The effects of the COVID-19 crisis weren’t all rosy, however. Jonathan Roberts, CVS’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, acknowledged that “the biggest headwind we’re seeing now in pharmacy is really around new therapy starts.” Because doctor visits have decreased significantly, CVS saw at least a 25% dip in new prescriptions in April compared with the same month in 2019, whereas it normally sees about 7% growth.

Overall in the quarter, CVS recorded adjusted earnings per share (EPS) of $1.91, “well above” the Wall Street consensus of $1.62, as Citi analyst Ralph Giacobbe highlighted in a May 6 investor note. Total revenues increased 8.3% in the first quarter of 2020 compared with the prior-year quarter.

MMIT Reality Check on Anemia — Chronic Kidney Disease (May 2020)

May 8, 2020

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for anemia treatments due to chronic kidney disease, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for anemia treatments due to chronic kidney disease, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for anemia treatments due to chronic kidney disease shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 55% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In November 2019, AstraZeneca said its FibroGen-partnered drug roxadustat, an oral first-in-class drug to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, demonstrated positive results in its Phase III trial.