Gilead Sciences, Inc. recently revealed that for promising COVID-19 treatment remdesivir, it will charge $2,340 for a typical five-day, six-vial treatment course for people covered by U.S. government health programs and $3,120 for those covered by private insurance, AIS Health reported.

In an open letter, Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day argued that Gilead priced remdesivir “well below” its estimated value, considering it can save the U.S. health care system approximately $12,000 per patient by reducing the length of COVID-19 patients’ hospital stays.

But not everyone is convinced by that argument.

“So they’re saying by shortening hospital stays, the system is going to save all these monies, but I always ask the question, ‘Why is it that the drug company should get to pocket all or some substantial portion of that savings?'” says Jack Hoadley, Ph.D., a research professor emeritus at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute. “That’s a savings we should accumulate for consumers, for payers [and] everybody else.”

Hoadley is not alone in those views. The advocacy group Patients for Affordable Drugs, in a June 29 statement, wrote that “Gilead’s price for remdesivir shows once again that we can’t trust Big Pharma to act responsibly — even in the face of a global pandemic.”

The U.S. government helped fund the development of remdesivir, and dexamethasone — a generic steroid — is priced at less than $1 per day even though it ‘showed promise for combating severe COVID-19 cases and reducing potential mortality rates,” the organization said.

The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) also brought up dexamethasone in its statement. The U.S. price range of $2,340 to $3,120 is “is largely in line with ICER’s independent assessment suggesting that a price of approximately $2,800 would be reasonable in proportion to the added benefits for patients and the cost offsets in the health system now that dexamethasone is rapidly becoming standard of care,” wrote ICER President Steven D. Pearson, M.D.

Leerink analyst Geoffrey Porges, in a June 29 note to investors, pointed out that the U.S. commercial price set for remdesivir was below his firm’s expectations. Still, “we believe the disclosed [remdesivir] pricing is reasonable, and should provide significant value to the Gilead shareholders and still deflect much of the criticism the company might face in this emergency,” Porges wrote.