Spotlight on MMIT Team

Ryan Schuler

March 22, 2021

Ryan Schuler is a vice president of sales and business development at MMIT. With a background in specialty pharmacy and data analytics, he runs go-to-market (GTM) sales for MMIT’s specialty pharmacy, hubs and health care IT partnerships. His main goals are to continue developing MMIT’s offerings and make them more actionable for his GTM verticals.

Who are your primary clients at MMIT?

We work with specialty pharmacy organizations, hub services, and health care IT partners.

Ryan Schuler is a vice president of sales and business development at MMIT. With a background in specialty pharmacy and data analytics, he runs go-to-market (GTM) sales for MMIT’s specialty pharmacy, hubs and health care IT partnerships. His main goals are to continue developing MMIT’s offerings and make them more actionable for his GTM verticals.

Who are your primary clients at MMIT?

We work with specialty pharmacy organizations, hub services, and health care IT partners. We look to develop partnerships with each of these groups to allow them to make their sales, operations and software goals more attainable for themselves as well as their patients and customers.

How do such large data sets open up access for clients?

When a patient gets prescribed, let’s say, an oncology medication because they have cancer, it either goes to a hub first, or it goes directly to a specialty pharmacy. And [the prescriber] immediately needs to do a benefit verification. They would normally have to call the payer, look for benefit information online and figure out if the product needs prior authorization. If it does, then they need to know those requirements. As an organization, we’ve traditionally looked at a high-level view, and now we’re making this data something that’s going to move a patient’s journey a lot more quickly. Our software also allows our health care IT partners to enhance their offerings by leveraging our payer, financial assistance and coverage data.

And where do health care IT clients come in?

Health care in general is a fragmented and antiquated space, and everybody’s trying to be more cost conscious and patient centric, which involves knowing what’s on formulary and what’s not on formulary. [IT clients] use our data in combination with their own software. We aim to find partners that would leverage our various offerings to improve their offerings. As more and more organizations look to get a fuller view of the patient journey, we aim to help bring the access understanding to that journey and show how it can be made actionable.

What are some trends you’re seeing in the industry now?

There is a big emphasis on the usage of data and analytics to help move innovation forward. Other industries are saturated with usage of data, AI and machine learning, whereas health care is really just starting to see the benefits of these things. With the pandemic keeping everyone a lot more isolated, there has been a more accelerated shift to adopt technology. The need to keep costs down, enhance patient outcomes and experience, and reduce the fragmented nature of the health care continuum is at an all-time high. All areas of the industry are looking to upgrade in these areas.

Which departments do you work with in MMIT the most?

I work with our marketing team, building a lot of the go-to-market stuff for each of these verticals. I work with the product team because there’s additional data sources that we need to be able to make that patient-level action a reality. We also work with finance to create pricing models and API modeling around how we scale the business for our IT partnerships. We have to work together to engage our customers and speak to the specificity of what we offer.

What’s been one of your biggest successes at the company?

I see success as when we start to make our ideas a reality while also investing in the success of our partners. It’s also closing some of those deals where we hadn’t traditionally looked at that business model. We made MMIT’s policy and restrictions data more actionable for specialty pharmacy and hubs, and we’d never really sold that data into these spaces before.

What do you like about working at MMIT?

There’s an ability to think differently about the business and have an environment that gives me the support, the buy-in and the autonomy to figure all of this out. That’s been the big draw to MMIT. We have great leadership that can see the vision we are trying to create as we continue to broaden our reach in the access space. Making all of this a reality has been very exciting.

What does MMIT do in your own words?

MMIT allows the health care continuum to understand market access in a comprehensive and streamlined way to ultimately advance care in a positive direction.

What do you like to do when you’re not working?

Pre-pandemic I used to travel a lot and I’m looking forward to picking that up again when all of this settles down. I am a big foodie, and living in NYC allows for plenty of opportunities to try all different foods. I also try and stay active doing a lot of outdoor and team sport related activities.

by Lisa Gillespie

Laura deSouza

February 22, 2021

Laura deSouza is a product owner at MMIT. She’s part of a growing team that manages MMIT’s data systems — the searchable tools that grant clients access to payer formularies and drug prior authorization requirements — among other datasets. She helps prioritize products based on client needs, ensuring our product teams are using their highly specialized skillsets to maximize efficiency and value.

What does your day usually look like?

My day-to-day involves a lot of fielding support tickets that come through,

Laura deSouza is a product owner at MMIT. She’s part of a growing team that manages MMIT’s data systems — the searchable tools that grant clients access to payer formularies and drug prior authorization requirements — among other datasets. She helps prioritize products based on client needs, ensuring our product teams are using their highly specialized skillsets to maximize efficiency and value.

What does your day usually look like?

My day-to-day involves a lot of fielding support tickets that come through, planning improvements with the tech team and taking requirements from the client support teams and data operations. It’s a fun balance of helping put out fires and planning solutions.

What kind of products do you manage?

Recently I took ownership of the API — or an application programming interface — which is basically a way to stream data. There are a lot of ways that we deliver data. In data services, we’re thinking about how we take in the data — like web scraping, or people entering data into an application — and then all the calculations to mush that data together and come up with a coherent picture. And then finally, there’s how we deliver the data. Our API fuels our coverage search application, a free app that you can get on your iPad if you need to search for formulary data on any product or plan. When you’re looking at that data, it’s coming from the API. We have clients who use our API directly to fuel their websites.

Who do you work with the most at MMIT?

I work closely with the product owners of our different applications, because these other applications rely upon our data. If you’re building something in a different application that doesn’t align with what our data can handle, then you’re in a trouble spot. I actually work most often with the tech team, which executes and helps design our data solutions.

How did you get into this field?

In my previous life, I was in neurobiology in academia. It made me very comfortable with large datasets and coding. And when you’re in science, a lot of what you’re trying to do is take large amounts of data and produce a story that makes sense to people. If you have a conversation with a scientist who knows your specific field, you’re going to talk with a certain level of detail vs. a scientist who isn’t within that specialty. You have to be flexible and have those different levels of conversation available, which I think applies to products, too. You have to talk to the client teams about what matters for the client, to operations about what matters to them, and do trainings on how to use the product.

What’s been your biggest success at your job so far?

One of my biggest accomplishments was working on the Medicaid initiative, where we implemented a new set of business rules. This is probably the first time new rules were developed at the company since about 2016, and it was more complicated than anything else we had done in the past. Now what we’re finding is that those business rules have really improved our data, and we’re hoping to enable them across the board.

Medicaid has a whole series of regulations that dictate how payers have to cover drugs, via national level mandates and state level mandates. We figured out how to program them in, and made sure that as mandates change, we can keep up with the changes. It actually took a panel of people to do the work that the rule does automatically in the background.

What exactly is a business rule?

We have something like 2,000 formularies and 150,000 products in a database. For each product, we try to capture how each one is covered on each formulary, and we have a bunch of teams working really hard to capture as much published data as possible. Payers don’t publish everything, so we have to fill in the gaps. If a drug is not actually listed on a payer’s website, we have to figure out how it is covered. Business rules are meant to answer that exact question — to fill in the gaps that payers leave on their websites or in the data that they send to us.

What does MMIT do, in your own words?

We bring together different sources of health care data to try to give actionable pictures of the state of things so that our clients — whether they are pharma, payers or specialty pharmacies — take actions that will help them serve their own clients better.

What do you like to do outside of work?

Gosh, it’s pretty much all day baby. [deSouza had her first child in 2020]. I also like to bake, and I like to sew!

 

Tiffany Moyer

January 25, 2021

Tiffany Moyer is a senior human resources business partner at MMIT. She is responsible for providing strategic HR support for MMIT business decisions. She also works on MMIT’s organizational design, which can encompass role structure, compensation structure and generalist human resource functions such as payroll.

What does your day to day look like?

Since we’re currently virtual, I talk to a different employee every day to check in to help build that relationship since we’re often working on different projects,

Tiffany Moyer is a senior human resources business partner at MMIT. She is responsible for providing strategic HR support for MMIT business decisions. She also works on MMIT’s organizational design, which can encompass role structure, compensation structure and generalist human resource functions such as payroll.

What does your day to day look like?

Since we’re currently virtual, I talk to a different employee every day to check in to help build that relationship since we’re often working on different projects, such as updating the employee handbook or supporting an employee through an FMLA leave. I would say 50% of my day is talking to people external to HR, and the other 50% of my day is collaborating with HR and putting together administrative processes or documents.

What sets MMIT’s employees apart?

Everyone’s really knowledgeable in their field, and it’s amazing to see people operate at that level. I think the biggest thing for me is that MMIT still retains some of the aspects of a small company, but has grown into a mid-size company. And people, especially in this virtual environment, have done an amazing job at maintaining that closeness, which I’ve been really impressed by.

What are some of the new processes in HR that you’re putting in place?

A lot of what we’re looking at for 2021 is about employee growth and retention. For example, I’ve heard from employees that they don’t really know what’s next in their career path. We’re now working on tools and resources around that. So okay, this is what the job does, but what are the skillsets required? Where do you fall in that skill level? And how can you grow and develop those skills?

That already happens in the company to some extent, but it could be so much more impactful if people knew more about what everyone does. This way you don’t necessarily have to know someone to know what they do. We will have more visibility around all roles in the company.

It sounds like this tool will also help employees who want to move up in their own departments.

Definitely. We’re using a tool for skilled management called Visual Workforce. We’ll be piloting that in a few areas this year. Let’s say we’re talking about developers —you’ll be able to look at the developer career path, and the skillsets and requirements needed for a senior developer. Maybe there’s certain coding languages you’ll need to know, and the employee can go in and assess where they fall. And then they’ll know what areas they can continue to grow toward.

And why is having this information for employees important?

The biggest thing for us is really the people. The ability to grow sales, the ability to retain clients, the ability to perform quality work, and the ability to deliver great data only happens because of our people. If you have people doing well at these things, we don’t want to lose them. We really want to make sure we are investing in them and giving them more opportunities to take their talent and knowledge into other areas and continue to drive sales and retain our clients.

Are there any other initiatives you’d like to mention?

We are working to bring in a training center called MMIT University — it’s not just an HR initiative. We’re trying to give fundamental knowledge to new employees on what market access is, what our industry is and what we do, and also how employees can talk about our products with different clients. Learning and development is really a big thing to me when it comes to how you support employees.

How do you think these processes improve MMIT overall?

I think it helps take away the questions. A lot of what we do provides structure — this is how performance reviews are done, this is what employee roles are, these are the expectations, this is who I go to if I have a referral for recruiting — it allows employees to focus on the task at hand when they don’t have to worry about these other things.

Where do you see MMIT one year from now?

Part of the growth this year was to put more structure and foundation around how we do things and take things from a small company to a mid-sized company and have that infrastructure in place as we grow. The plan for 2021 is to continue to grow as a company, including organically by driving more sales, and then preparing for any other types of inorganic growth, like acquisitions.

What are some of the biggest challenges of your role?

Some of the things we do are still very manual from an HR perspective. So it takes more time to double check yourself, to make sure that you have the right information, especially if we have new hires. The day we have new hires is probably the most time-consuming day of the week for me, because I want to meet them, go through HR orientation and spend that time with them. But then I also have to hire them in our system. And since that is a step-by-step process, and you’re handling people’s information, I take it very seriously and try to make sure I’m completely accurate, so that takes a lot of time.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I go for runs at lunch and listen to an audiobook, and that takes me away for a minute and gives me a nice little break. And then when I’m done, I feel really energized by the endorphins.

By Lisa Gillespie

 

Keith Giddens

December 28, 2020

Keith Giddens is MMIT’s Chief Performance Officer. He is responsible for helping teams execute on their goals, such as data quality and process improvement. This includes meeting with departments and teams on a weekly basis to help employees develop strategies to meet their goals, and promoting accountability for deliverables that push progress forward. Giddens works with many employees within MMIT, from C-Suite executives to those responsible for executing on larger goals.

How did your background bring you to MMIT?

Keith Giddens is MMIT’s Chief Performance Officer. He is responsible for helping teams execute on their goals, such as data quality and process improvement. This includes meeting with departments and teams on a weekly basis to help employees develop strategies to meet their goals, and promoting accountability for deliverables that push progress forward. Giddens works with many employees within MMIT, from C-Suite executives to those responsible for executing on larger goals.

How did your background bring you to MMIT?

I traveled around the world, working with companies on helping them execute strategic goals. I did that as a consultant with a global firm. We designed and implemented execution plans in multiple industries. I worked with the Carnival Cruise Lines and I also built out the European Hilton Hotel Execution plan. I worked with CEO Mike Gallup on a 2-year project and Iater joined him at MMIT.

What does your day to day look like?

Every day I meet with teams and their leaders, and we look at their execution on their goals. With some of our teams, I’m in the process of helping them build their goals out. We design plans, implement them, coach our teams — everything our people need to execute on their goals.

And when you came on, were there already existing projects you had to work on, or were these processes brand new?

There were things already going on within the company. I was brought in to look and say, ‘What is it that we need to go after?’ And then, ‘How do we get there in an execution framework?’ We’ve got a big project for the 2021 strategic goals and initiatives that I’m heavily involved in now, and I’m working with all of our leaders on setting those up.

Can you talk about a project you’re currently working on?

One of our biggest initiatives is to improve the quality of the data that our clients use. When you get into the technology teams, they have individual initiatives that they’re working on that help to improve the data. I come and help them deconstruct the initiative, break it down, ask who the contributors on the team are and what teams are involved, and then we design and implement the execution plan.

You’ve worked in a wide variety of industries. How has that applied at MMIT?

I’m not an expert in the cruise line industry, or the hotel industry or the banking industry. My expertise is putting in a framework to execute on big goals. I begin by asking a lot of questions, including what the most strategic goals are, and then I help narrow the focus. At a lot of organizations, they’ll have multiple goals. And they don’t get anything done, because there’s too much going on. I help them through what individuals can do differently on a daily basis. But it’s not me coming in and saying, ‘Okay, in order for you to reach this deliverable every month, this is what you need to do.’ No, they know what they need to do, or they’ll come up with it. We’ll set up a weekly cadence of accountability, where they’re on a call, and they’re looking at the scoreboard, and they’re asking themselves, ‘Are we doing what we said we would do?’

That buy-in from individuals sounds crucial to making progress.

When you think about the overall goal of the organization, the decision lives in the corner offices — they have the ability to decide the organizational goal. But when you start to deconstruct down to functional groups, departments, divisions, teams — those individuals need to figure out how their contributions help meet that goal. And when they do that, they own it.

What has been one of your biggest challenges so far?

The biggest challenge, without fail, is what we call ‘whirlwind’, the day job. People are very busy. They’re not incompetent, they’re just busy. So what ends up happening in those weekly meetings is someone says, ‘Oh, I couldn’t get to this because I’m so busy.’ That’s why we have this cadence of accountability. If I know that I’m going to walk into an accountability meeting every Tuesday at 10 a.m., and I’ve got to report what I said I would do, and then report on what I’m going to do later, I’m more inclined to do it.

What would you say is the most exciting part of the job?

The most exciting part of the job is when a team can actually see the connection between their commitment to what they said that they’d do, and to the actual goals that they set for themselves. That’s very motivating.

What do you like about your job?

The people. I just like interacting with people. There are all kinds of people. And there are team dynamics where certain teams are very cohesive, and other teams, not so much. Working with leadership to help them see how they can help their team members, I like doing that.

What does MMIT do, in your own words?

We’re trying to smooth access to therapies. It really is the whole purpose of the business. As we improve our data, it will smooth access to therapies, and as we get better at our technology, it will smooth access to therapies. That’s the ‘why’ behind MMIT.

Where do you think MMIT will be a year from now?

MMIT is going to continue to improve and grow. We’ve got our new CEO Mike Gallup, who has built a leadership team that is very deep and experienced. I think in 2021, you’re going to see us getting better in terms of timeliness and accuracy. We’re going to grow, meaning we’ll have more customers and we’ll have more of the market.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I have a large family, and that’s my free time, really. I have four children that are all married, and I have 10 grandchildren with the 11th on the way. I have some land, and five of my grandchildren live on my property and four live in the area. So every single day, I see grandchildren. We have built anything that a kid desires on that land: zip lines, swings, trampolines, trails, biking, I’ve got a little waterfall, anything that they want to play in. That’s where we spend our time.

Dan Cushman

November 23, 2020

Dan Cushman is the senior director of sales analytics and operations at MMIT. He joined the company in October 2019 to build the sales operations team, which works to drive efficiency among the sales teams and their support staff. Cushman and his team also aggregate data on various products and sales, analyzing that data and making recommendations for actionable insights to drive revenue.

What do you do, in your own words?

My team and I are responsible for ensuring that the internal operations within the commercial team are running smoothly.

Dan Cushman is the senior director of sales analytics and operations at MMIT. He joined the company in October 2019 to build the sales operations team, which works to drive efficiency among the sales teams and their support staff. Cushman and his team also aggregate data on various products and sales, analyzing that data and making recommendations for actionable insights to drive revenue.

What do you do, in your own words?

My team and I are responsible for ensuring that the internal operations within the commercial team are running smoothly. This allows the sellers and all the supporting teams to be more efficient and help drive revenue. We look at sales, analysis and planning, financial operations, information systems, onboarding, enablement and various cross functional support programs. It’s essentially handling a lot of the administrative day-to-day functions within the commercial team.

Can you tell me more about sales operations?

You have the sales team, you have the business development team — the people who help source the deals for sales — and then you have a solution consulting team that provides technical support during the sale, and they all provide a lot of expertise. Then you have sales operations, who handles more of the numbers, process and technologies.

You’ll have sellers who spend too much time with administrative items, like entering data. What my team does is we provide some simplicity to it, we streamline things so that instead of them spending two hours a day on stuff that is not selling, we’ll get that to 30 minutes a day.

Where does the analysis part of your team come in?

If we’re thinking about insights in terms of a general forecasting perspective, we can provide insights on where our pipeline is coming from, where our pipeline is dropping off, where we are losing business and where are our competitors are beating us.

If I see something pop up, and I’m like, “wow, this is a really good insight,” I will float that upstream to my chief commercial officer and say, “this is what I’m seeing. If we change this, it could change the course of revenue, or help expand the business.”

How did you join the company? What in your background brought you to pharma?

I have a history in the health care space over the last 16-plus years; there’s a lot of overlapping connections to the MMIT world. I’ve always had an awareness of market access,

and the prowess that MMIT exemplifies. I was brought on to build out a sales operations function. For me, it was too good to pass up. There was no dedicated team to perform this function, so it was a team of one when I joined last year.

What your day to day like?

Each day is unique in terms of our scope. And to me, that’s what makes it exciting. Depending on the time of the month, quarter or year, along with other factors, it usually involves being deeply engaged in analytical exercises, tackling operational items or simply planning for the next year.

What larger projects have you been working on?

One of the biggest things we’ve focused on is improving the organizational tools we use to track sales. We’re making progress in terms of the data that we’re storing, and the various pieces of information that we’re tracking. This in turn makes it a bit easier to say, “okay, here’s an area that we should be targeting.” It allows our sales team to have an all-encompassing look at their accounts, and what their deals look like. You can’t drive revenue if you’re not capturing the right information.

What’s been the most exciting part of your role?

Being part of an expansion function is really rewarding. You’re able to come in, devise a strategy and work from a clean slate. It’s all been a culmination of my entire career, to kind of say, “what’s the expertise that I’ve gained and how can I apply that to a blank slate to make the company more effective?”

What do you like about MMIT?

For me, it’s the people. There are a lot of really sharp people at MMIT. Everyone’s willing to roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty. There’s a real entrepreneurial feel to MMIT, especially for the people that have been here for a while that have seen the company evolve. And for me, that’s in line with my personality, and how I approach business in general.

What does MMIT do, in your own words?

MMIT smooths access to therapies and leverages data to provide transparency across the commercial landscape. I just don’t see any competitors doing things the same way. We’re really in a unique position because of the level of service that we provide and the granularity of data that we provide — it’s of much higher quality than any of our competitors.

Where do you see MMIT in five years?

As MMIT grows as a company, I would anticipate further acquisitions, so there will be a lot of growth, which opens more opportunities for bringing on new technologies, new types of analytics, and new ways of thinking that will make the sellers’ jobs easier.

What do you like to do in your free time?

My wife and I got into kayaking this year, so that’s been exciting to explore a new hobby. We’ve also gotten involved with building Legos, which has allowed us to kind of spend some quality time together without the interference of our various technologies. Outside of that, you can kind of generally find us binge watching shows on Netflix or just hanging out with our four dogs.

by MMIT Team