Payer

MMIT Reality Check on Growth Hormone Deficiency (Apr 2021)

April 16, 2021

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for growth hormone deficiency (GHD) treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for growth hormone deficiency (GHD) treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for growth hormone deficiency treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 55% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: When the FDA approved Novo Nordisk, Inc.’s Sogroya (somapacitanbeco) for the replacement of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency in August 2020, it became the only long-acting agent on the market. A survey by Zitter Insights shows that many endocrinologists expect to shift prescribing to such agents from the short-acting growth hormones.

MMIT Reality Check on Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Apr 2021)

April 9, 2021

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for acute myeloid leukemia treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for acute myeloid leukemia treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for acute myeloid leukemia treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 65% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered with utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In October 2020, the FDA gave full approval to AbbVie Inc. and Roche Group unit Genentech USA, Inc.’s Venclexta (venetoclax) in combination with azacitidine, decitabine or low-dose cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in people at least 75 years old or who have comorbidities that preclude the use of intensive induction chemotherapy.

Radar On Market Access: Interoperability Mandate Could Be an Opportunity for Payers

April 8, 2021

Payers should look at the looming interoperability mandate as a chance to gain a lasting advantage over their competitors, according to two health care information technology (IT) experts.

In a March 26 webinar hosted by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), IBM Vice President Michael Curry of Watson Health and Jeff Rivkin, research director for payer IT strategies at IDC Insights, said payers should do more than meet the minimum interoperability standards, AIS Health reported.

Payers should look at the looming interoperability mandate as a chance to gain a lasting advantage over their competitors, according to two health care information technology (IT) experts.

In a March 26 webinar hosted by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), IBM Vice President Michael Curry of Watson Health and Jeff Rivkin, research director for payer IT strategies at IDC Insights, said payers should do more than meet the minimum interoperability standards, AIS Health reported.

“It’s just the tip of the iceberg. We’re going to see a lot of data exchanged. And if you don’t have a fairly robust platform to be able to do that, you’re going to hurt next year, too,” Rivkin said.

Starting July 2021, HHS will require insurers that sell Medicare Advantage, Medicaid and CHIP managed care, and Affordable Care Act exchange plans to launch an application programming interface (API) that will allow patients to access their complete medical and claims history on demand along with a continually updated provider directory. Payers must also make all of their patient and claims data available to other insurers on a payer-to-payer data exchange, which must be in place by January 2022.

Rivkin said insurers should think about the interoperability mandate and the mandate to release pricing information as the same project. Starting on Jan. 1, 2023, health plans must offer members online shopping tools that allow them to see the negotiated rate between their provider and their plan, as well as a personalized estimate of their out-of-pocket cost for 500 of the most shoppable items and services.

“We’re all in the middle of those implementations, but there’s a huge downstream potential for that data,” Curry explained. He says the pandemic-spurred telehealth boom has accelerated changes in consumer expectations.

“The consumer side…has changed a lot in how payers have to think about their relationships with clients,” Curry added. Consumers, he said, now expect accessing health care to be more similar to “buying something on Amazon.”

“Amazon and those like it have raised the bar from the consumerism perspective,” Rivkin said. “Now, you’ve got a significant number of people in the individual market switching because they shop for price. The idea that retail companies have had for years of loyalty and stickiness…is now relevant to health insurance.”

Radar On Market Access: Study Highlights Promise of Bundled Payments in Employer Plans

April 6, 2021

A bundled payment program run by San Francisco-based digital health company Carrum Health resulted in an average per-episode savings of more than $16,000 per orthopedic or surgical procedure, a recent RAND Corp. analysis found.

Counting both procedures reimbursed under the bundled payment program and procedures reimbursed outside the program, per-episode costs for the three procedures studied — spinal fusion, major joint replacement and bariatric surgery — were 10.7% lower overall, on average, than costs for comparable procedures prior to implementation of the program. That added up to a total savings of $4,229 per episode, the study found.

A bundled payment program run by San Francisco-based digital health company Carrum Health resulted in an average per-episode savings of more than $16,000 per orthopedic or surgical procedure, a recent RAND Corp. analysis found.

Counting both procedures reimbursed under the bundled payment program and procedures reimbursed outside the program, per-episode costs for the three procedures studied — spinal fusion, major joint replacement and bariatric surgery — were 10.7% lower overall, on average, than costs for comparable procedures prior to implementation of the program. That added up to a total savings of $4,229 per episode, the study found.

The analysis, published in the March issue of Health Affairs, determined that employer-sponsored health plans captured approximately 85% of the total savings, or $3,582 per episode. Patient cost-sharing payments decreased by $498 per episode, a 27.7% relative decrease.

“What we studied is a program that uses provider-focused financial incentives to give providers plans to operate more efficiently, and then also pairs it with incentives to patients to use high-value providers,” study author Christopher Whaley, a policy researcher in health care at the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica, Calif., tells AIS Health. “What we found is that, following the introduction of this program, overall episode costs fell by quite a bit, and patient cost-sharing actually went to zero for patients who went through the program.”

“[The] bundled prices tend to be quite a bit lower than if we just go through the normal insurance system,” Whaley says, noting that the providers give up higher prices for a guaranteed payment with no insurance road blocks or red tape. Implementation of the direct payments program also was associated with reductions in price variation, the study found.

Although researchers didn’t look at outcomes as thoroughly as they did costs, they did find that some outcomes appeared to be better in patients participating in the bundled payment program, Whaley says: “For example, for bariatric surgery, the national commercial patient readmission rate is, I think, around 4%, and for the patients who went through the program, it was 0.5%. So it looks like readmissions are about 75% lower, which is a huge quality difference.”

MMIT Reality Check on COPD (Apr 2021)

April 2, 2021

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for COPD treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

According to our recent payer coverage analysis for COPD treatments, combined with news from key healthcare influencers, market access is shifting in this drug landscape.

To help make sense of this new research, MMIT’s team of experts analyzes the data and summarizes the key findings for you. The following are brief highlights. To read the full piece, including payer coverage, drug competition and prescriber trends, click here.

Payer Coverage: A review of market access for COPD treatments shows that under the pharmacy benefit, about 66% of the lives under commercial formularies are covered without utilization management restrictions.

Trends: In July 2020, the FDA approved AstraZeneca’s Breztri Aerosphere (budesonide/glycopyrrolate/formoterol fumarate) for the maintenance treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Perspectives on Cigna’s MDLive Deal

April 1, 2021

Health insurers have begun to consolidate their position in the telehealth market, as indicated by a recent move by Cigna Corp. to acquire MDLive Inc. Meanwhile, lawmakers are beginning to consider the future of telehealth regulation and payment, AIS Health reported.

Cigna’s Evernorth health services arm announced on Feb. 26 that it had reached an agreement with MDLive to acquire the virtual care provider, according to MDLive’s website. MDLive has been available in-network as a primary care option to all members of Cigna’s commercial plans since January 2020.

Health insurers have begun to consolidate their position in the telehealth market, as indicated by a recent move by Cigna Corp. to acquire MDLive Inc. Meanwhile, lawmakers are beginning to consider the future of telehealth regulation and payment, AIS Health reported.

Cigna’s Evernorth health services arm announced on Feb. 26 that it had reached an agreement with MDLive to acquire the virtual care provider, according to MDLive’s website. MDLive has been available in-network as a primary care option to all members of Cigna’s commercial plans since January 2020.

Ashraf Shehata, national sector leader for health care and life sciences at KPMG, says he expects even more efforts by payers to offer telehealth benefits directly to members.

He adds that the COVID-19 pandemic has acted as an accelerant for telemedicine use. He expects patients will continue to demand telemedicine options even after the pandemic subsides, and that payers will see that demand as an opportunity to narrow the gap between themselves and members.

“We saw that with massive and immediate uptake of the platforms — all the platforms, I should say. Not only did [payers] use their existing platform relationships, but they added new platforms because demand is so high,” Shehata explains.

Shehata adds that robust, internal telemedicine options offer plans an opportunity to exercise leverage in negotiations with provider systems, which have sought to have virtual visits reimbursed at the same rate as traditional visits.

The payment equity question is central to the coming regulatory battle over telemedicine. Payer and plan sponsor lobbying groups will square off against providers in Congress over whether virtual visits should be reimbursed at the same rate as in-person visits. Early in the pandemic, the Trump administration mandated that Medicare must reimburse most telehealth visits at parity with traditional visits.

Also at issue is whether the full menu of services authorized in response to the pandemic will continue to be eligible for Medicare reimbursement. CMS expanded the types of services that could be delivered via telehealth to Medicare beneficiaries, temporarily adding 135 services. Unless Congress acts or the Biden administration issues new rules, the remaining expanded services will expire either at the end of 2021, or when the pandemic public health emergency ends.

In a March 2 hearing of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Health, legislators indicated that they are studying both issues.