Oncology

Medically Integrated Dispensing Chops Waste, Signals Expansion

Newly released results of a Prime Therapeutics LLC oncology program suggest that if the PBM were to expand its highly coordinated oral oncology dispensing model beyond the pilot population, cost savings could exceed $1 million. And these promising results signal that the model may be on the brink of expanding into more disease states.

Prime’s medically integrated dispensing (MID) model, which takes a high-touch, care coordination-intensive approach, cut waste by limiting overfills, according to a Prime study released June 2. Compared with the traditional central specialty pharmacy dispensing of oral oncology drugs, the MID pilot involving 627 patients across three commercial insurance plans showed the potential to cut $1,800 in costs “per medication dose change,” according to the results.

OCM Nears Its June 30 Conclusion Without Successor in Place

The Oncology Care Model (OCM) that CMS’s Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) launched almost six years ago is nearing its June 30 end. And while CMMI introduced its Oncology Care First model in November 2019 with an eye on the OCM successor launching before its predecessor’s end, it is unclear what the program’s status is at this point. OCM participants tell AIS Health, a division of MMIT, that their overall experience has been good as they await next steps from CMMI.

The OCM voluntary pilot started in July 2016 with 17 payers and 196 practices; five payers and 126 practices currently are participating. While it began as a five-year program, CMMI extended it for one additional year in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program reimburses providers for episodes of care in the form of a per-beneficiary per-month payment, as well as a possible performance-based payment, if Medicare expenditures are below a target price for an episode. The amount of the payment is tied to a provider’s achievement on various quality measures. All participants began with one-sided risk but could shift to two-sided risk in 2017. Following the 2018 introduction of an alternative two-sided risk arrangement, starting in January 2020, practices that did not earn at least one performance-based payment had to enter one of the two-sided risk options or leave the OCM. Practices that earned at least one performance-based payment could remain in one-sided risk.

New FDA Approvals: FDA Grants Additional Indication to Olumiant

May 10: The FDA granted full approval to Eli Lilly and Co.’s Olumiant (baricitinib) for the treatment of COVID-19 in hospitalized adults requiring supplemental oxygen, noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The agency first approved the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor on May 31, 2018. The drug has been available for COVID treatment since Nov. 19, 2020, under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). The EUA remains in place for hospitalized people between the ages of 2 and 18 years old who require various degrees of oxygen support. The recommended dose of the tablet for the newest use is 4 mg once daily for 14 days or until hospital discharge, whichever occurs first. Alternative modes of administration via oral dispersion, gastrostomy tube, nasogastric tube or orogastric tube are available. The drug’s list price for a 30-day supply of 2 mg tablets is $2,497.20.

New FDA Approvals: The FDA Approved Amneal’s Alymsys

April 13: The FDA approved Amneal Pharmaceuticals, Inc.’s Alymsys (bevacizumab-maly) for the treatment of multiple conditions: (1) first- or second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in combination with intravenous fluorouracil-based chemotherapy; (2) second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in combination with fluoropyrimidine-irinotecan or fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin chemotherapy in people who have progressed on a first-line bevacizumab product; (3) first-line treatment of unresectable, locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel; (4) recurrent glioblastoma in adults; (5) metastatic renal cell carcinoma in combination with interferon alfa; (6) persistent, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin or paclitaxel and topotecan; and (7) epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer in combination with paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan for platinum-resistant recurrent disease in people receiving no more than two prior chemotherapy regimens. The vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the third biosimilar of Roche Group member Genentech USA, Inc.’s Avastin (bevacizumab) that the agency has approved. Dosing of the intravenous infusion is based on indication.

A Look at Third-Party Oncology Clinical Pathways

In order to improve patient outcomes and reduce variations in oncology care, more and more payers and providers are adopting oncology clinical pathways (OCPs) — treatment protocols that aim to provide the optimal cancer care to patients at the lowest cost, according to a recent MMIT webinar. The share of oncologists exposed to third-party oncology pathways increased from 20% in 2015 to 52% in 2021, with one third of oncologists choosing a provider-focused pathway as of the fourth quarter of 2021. Breast cancer, multiple myeloma and non-small cell lung cancer are among the top therapeutic areas managed by third-party pathways.

CMS Rule on Pharma Patient-Assistance Programs Could Cut Back on Aid

CMS’s stance has long been that manufacturer-provided assistance given to patients is excluded from best price and average manufacturer price (AMP) calculation for prescription drugs. However, the rise of copayment accumulators and maximizers — and health insurers’ subsequent taking of this assistance rather than allowing it to count toward patients’ deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums — have caused the agency to rethink its position. A rule slated to take effect at the beginning of 2023 would reverse that longtime approach, potentially resulting in increased patient out-of-pocket costs for drugs and pharma companies being on the hook for ensuring they know exactly where their assistance is going, industry experts tell AIS Health, a division of MMIT.

The Medicaid rebate rule allows state Medicaid programs to get the same discounts on drug prices that manufacturers offer commercial plans purchasing prescription drugs. Manufacturers pay rebates to Medicaid programs that are calculated based on drugmakers’ best price, which is the lowest price the manufacturer gives to most providers of health care services or items, including hospitals, HMOs and MCOs — but not patients. It includes any price adjustments, such as discounts and rebates, but not manufacturer-provided assistance to patients.

A Look at Third-Party Oncology Clinical Pathways

In order to improve patient outcomes and reduce variations in oncology care, more and more payers and providers are adopting oncology clinical pathways (OCPs) — treatment protocols that aim to provide the optimal cancer care to patients at the lowest cost, according to a recent MMIT webinar. The share of oncologists exposed to third-party oncology pathways increased from 20% in 2015 to 52% in 2021, with one third of oncologists choosing a provider-focused pathway as of the fourth quarter of 2021. Breast cancer, multiple myeloma and non-small cell lung cancer are among the top therapeutic areas managed by third-party pathways.

A Look at Third-Party Oncology Clinical Pathways

In order to improve patient outcomes and reduce variations in oncology care, more and more payers and providers are adopting oncology clinical pathways (OCPs) — treatment protocols that aim to provide the optimal cancer care to patients at the lowest cost, according to a recent MMIT webinar. The share of oncologists exposed to third-party oncology pathways increased from 20% in 2015 to 52% in 2021, with one third of oncologists choosing a provider-focused pathway as of the fourth quarter of 2021. Breast cancer, multiple myeloma and non-small cell lung cancer are among the top therapeutic areas managed by third-party pathways.

Novartis’ Pluvicto Brings New Option to mCRPC Treatment

A new prostate cancer drug is sparking interest among payers and oncologists alike, according to a survey by Zitter Insights.

On March 23, the FDA approved Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.’s Pluvicto (lutetium Lu 177 vipivotide tetraxetan) (formerly referred to as 177Lu-PSMA-617) for the treatment of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in people who have been treated with androgen receptor pathway inhibition and taxane-based chemotherapy. The product from Novartis unit Advanced Accelerator Applications USA, Inc. is the first FDA-approved targeted radioligand therapy for eligible people with mCRPC that combines a targeting compound with a therapeutic radioisotope.

CMS Targets Patient-Assistance Programs; Rule Could Curtail Aid

CMS’s stance has long been that manufacturer-provided assistance given to patients is excluded from Best Price and average manufacturer price (AMP) calculation for prescription drugs. However, the rise of copayment accumulators and maximizers and health insurers’ subsequent taking of this assistance rather than allowing it to count toward patients’ deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums have caused the agency to rethink its position. A rule slated to take effect at the beginning of 2023 would reverse that longtime approach, potentially resulting in increased patient out-of-pocket costs for drugs and pharma companies being on the hook for ensuring they know exactly where their assistance is going, industry experts tell AIS Health, a division of MMIT.

The Medicaid rebate rule allows state Medicaid programs to get the same discounts on drug prices that manufacturers offer commercial plans purchasing prescription drugs. Manufacturers pay rebates to Medicaid programs that are calculated based on drugmakers’ Best Price, which is the lowest price the manufacturer gives to most providers of health care services or items, including hospitals, HMOs and MCOs — but not patients. It includes any price adjustments, such as discounts and rebates, but not manufacturer-provided assistance to patients.